dotgal

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A local client is interested in getting more visibility for location search terms. They are a service business that drives to the customers' location so the area coverage is quite large. For example target keywords would be "[service] los angeles", "[service] irvine", etc.

What I've found out in my keyword research is that there is low search volume for the combination "[service] + location". However, for the term "[service] near me" there's actually decent search volume. Is it worth it to target location specific terms then? So if the site optimizes for "[service] los angeles" is it possible for the client's site to rank when a user queries "[service] near me"? Note, the client's business address isn't in Los Angeles.
 

Colan Nielsen

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I optimize for both the location and near me. We have done a ton of testing on optimizing for “near me” terms (ex: “plumber near me”) and have found that adding instances of “near you”, “nearby” and “near me” to the content of a page (including meta tags) does have a positive impact on ranking.
 

Contractor

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Colon, Which meta tags are you using “near me” in? The description? Or others?

Dookie, you mentioned that people don’t seem to be searching for “service + location” very much. But if a person searches for “service” alone and they are doing so from Irvine, then wouldn’t optimizing for “service in Irvine” help out?
 

Colan Nielsen

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Typically, the meta description and title tag. I try to review GMB Insights and Search Console queries on a regular basis to discover new "near me" keyword variations that people are typing into Google.
 

caveman75

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Hi Colan... I was wondering how you phase the "near me" "near you" in title without having appear like KW stuffing? I've consider using these KW's in Meta Descriptions in the form of a question. So for our case I would write, "looking for a personal chef near you?" then go on to answer this in the MD as well. Is this a good strategy? I'm curious about this because honestly there isn't a lot of volume and disparity in what's being searched regarding our business. It's pretty much private/personal chef near me or in CT. Thanks
 

Colan Nielsen

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I was wondering how you phase the "near me" "near you" in title without having appear like KW stuffing? I've consider using these KW's in Meta Descriptions in the form of a question. So for our case I would write, "looking for a personal chef near you?"

You're on the right path with that example!
 

Contractor

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So for our case I would write, "looking for a personal chef near you?" then go on to answer this in the MD as well. Is this a good strategy?
I did something like that, I made it into a little slogan since my company name rhymes with "near me".

The other variants that Colan mentioned ("nearby" and "near you") are easier to work in.
 

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