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beisbol16

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I am in the process of building my pressure washing business website. It will have a basic structure of:

-Homepage
-FAQ
-Blog
-Pricing
-Services
—Service type 1
—Service type 2
—Service type 1
-Locations
—Town 1
—Town 2
—Town 3

My questions:

1. Should I have “hidden” pages for EVERY town that I service? There are 4 or 5 towns are my main target market, but I don’t want to neglect the other 20 or so smaller towns that people would search for. I can’t imagine listen them in the locations drop-down though. Also, since I’ll be running google ads, wouldn’t it be best to set up a campaign to capture town specific searches such as: “pressure Washing in Easton”… which would send the searcher to the location page dedicated to that town?

2. Regarding google ads: I was thinking of setting up multiple campaigns for long tail keywords such as “how much does it cost to have my house pressure washed in Easton”. Should I set up hidden landing pages for each ppc longtailed keyword query? This would be to specifically answer the users question? Or is just sending them to either the location pages, faq page, or blog post enough?

Any recommendations or best practices around this general topic would be greatly appreciated !!

Thanks
 
Solution
1. Should I have “hidden” pages for EVERY town that I service? There are 4 or 5 towns are my main target market, but I don’t want to neglect the other 20 or so smaller towns that people would search for. I can’t imagine listen them in the locations drop-down though. Also, since I’ll be running google ads, wouldn’t it be best to set up a campaign to capture town specific searches such as: “pressure Washing in Easton”… which would send the searcher to the location page dedicated to that town?
You don't need to hide them. What I do is create one or two at a time, measure performance of the pages and rinse and repeat if they are hitting your goals. No need to add them all to the menu.

I'll see if I can get someone to chime in...
1. Should I have “hidden” pages for EVERY town that I service? There are 4 or 5 towns are my main target market, but I don’t want to neglect the other 20 or so smaller towns that people would search for. I can’t imagine listen them in the locations drop-down though. Also, since I’ll be running google ads, wouldn’t it be best to set up a campaign to capture town specific searches such as: “pressure Washing in Easton”… which would send the searcher to the location page dedicated to that town?
You don't need to hide them. What I do is create one or two at a time, measure performance of the pages and rinse and repeat if they are hitting your goals. No need to add them all to the menu.

I'll see if I can get someone to chime in about the ads question.
 
Solution
You don't need to hide them. What I do is create one or two at a time, measure performance of the pages and rinse and repeat if they are hitting your goals. No need to add them all to the menu.

I'll see if I can get someone to chime in about the ads question.

Great info. And I would really appreciate that (re Google ads)!
 
For the ads end of things, pretty much each of the pages that we setup as a landing page is specific to the campaign. We also hide it from search engines so we can track TRUE traffic in Google Analytics. Basically, nobody would be on that page unless they came through the campaign. Makes for easy tracking.

Since we're in landing page territory, depending on the client, we strip sections of the header and footer and guide the user directly to what we're wanting them to do - info, call, purchase, signup, etc. There's a button to visit the full site, but the aim on the campaign on the AdWords is usually to get the user to do a specific thing.

Content on the page affects the price you pay on the Google Ads, so being sure the content is in line with the campaign also plays a role.
 
For the ads end of things, pretty much each of the pages that we setup as a landing page is specific to the campaign. We also hide it from search engines so we can track TRUE traffic in Google Analytics. Basically, nobody would be on that page unless they came through the campaign. Makes for easy tracking.

Since we're in landing page territory, depending on the client, we strip sections of the header and footer and guide the user directly to what we're wanting them to do - info, call, purchase, signup, etc. There's a button to visit the full site, but the aim on the campaign on the AdWords is usually to get the user to do a specific thing.

Content on the page affects the price you pay on the Google Ads, so being sure the content is in line with the campaign also plays a role.

Conor, I appreciate your response, sorry for the delay in saying that, I am just now getting around to it.

Would it be possible for you to send me an example of a nicely converting landing page for google ads for a SAB? I’m having trouble thinking about how it would be different than what’s already on my site. Any chance I can see an example of an “ads landing page for a service” vs the regular “service page” that’s on a SAB’s website?

Big thanks
 

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